Does Your HGV Have Direct Vision?

The way that HGVs work in London is changing. It’s not a small change either. It’s a drastic change that could see many of them banned from the capital.  This is in the wake of the new direct vision rules that have been implemented after years of debate and logistics. So, what does this mean? … Continue reading “Does Your HGV Have Direct Vision?”

By: Barry Lewis

The way that HGVs work in London is changing. It’s not a small change either. It’s a drastic change that could see many of them banned from the capital.  This is in the wake of the new direct vision rules that have been implemented after years of debate and logistics. So, what does this mean?

What is The Direct Vision Standards?

The Direct Vision Standards is pioneered by Londons mayor Sadiq Khan. This is a regulation that is aimed directly at the HGVs. The idea is that all of the HGVs will be designated a star rating. This rating will go from 0 to 5 with 0 being the lowest and 5 the highest. This is going to be based on how much the driver can see the road and the environment when they’re looking through the cab window. This is opposed to the mirrors and cameras that may be installed in the HGV. Should the HGV score too low, then that particular HGV won’t be allowed to drive on the roads in London. This is after the revelation that HGVs were involved in 20 percent of fatalities that involved pedestrians and 70 percent of fatalities of cyclists in the London area. In spite of the HGVs only making 4 percent of the road miles in London the research has confirmed that HGV blind spots are a huge factor in the collisions. Thus, the Direct Vision Standards has been designed to help improve the safety of the roads and pavements in London.  EasyasHGV.co.uk support these changes and hope to see an impact on the reduction of accidents on the roads and make the streets safer for pedestrians and cyclists alike.

What Will Determine the Ratings?

This star rating system is going to work by assessing the amount that a driver can see from the area surrounding them. Of course, the greatest risks are the risks to pedestrians and cyclists. This risk area has been determined via an analysis of the collision data and the view that a person must be able to see in order to prevent a collision. There are 4 specific zones that are given a rating when they calculate the score.

This defined technical measurement is to calculate the overall volume of the area of risk that the driver can see. Each vehicle is given a score and this score will determine the rating of stars that the vehicle gets. The more area that the driver can see, the better the rating. Five stars are going to show the best rating and the lower ratings will be given depending on how well the driver can or can’t see.

When Does This Start?

In spite of a delay of a year, the Direct Vision Standard won’t begin right away. Transport for London has given a grace period for those HGVs that are able to improve their visibility. There will be exceptions to the rule according to those vehicles that don’t have a good rating but are implementing comprehensive safety systems. It’s hoped that such rules will reduce the number of accidents on the roads in London.  Since most of these are due to lack of vision, such decisions should help to reduce the rate of such fatalities and improve the visual radius before it’s too late.

Naturally, this is all dependent on the rating and all HGVs must be rated. Under the new regulations, the manufacturers and the haulage companies must now make sure that their vehicles are in compliance with such regulations so that they are able to comply with the star ratings. If not, they will be at risk to lose their business to others who are far more competitive and able to be in compliance. There are still many changes that will be implemented as these new regulations take effect. These include special permits and interim ratings for the star system. More and more HGVs are on the road today than ever before and it’s imperative that these HGVs comply with the new regulations to see an effect on the safety of the public. Pedestrians and cyclists alike will be safer once these are implemented.